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Black Market for Brides?

Full Citation: Brulé, R., "Black Market for Brides? NCAER Decentralization," Rural Governance and Inclusive Growth, Retrieved from http://www.ruralgov-ncaer.org/blogs/?p=172 (Mar. 2011).

Collection Type:
Articles
Country:
India
Creator:
Brulé, R.
Year:
2011

Gender Asset and Wealth Gaps Evidence from Ecuador, Ghana and Karnataka, India

Full citation: Cheryl Doss, Carmen Diana Deere, Abena D. Oduro, Hema Swaminathan, Suchitra J. Y., Rahul Lahoti, W. Baah-Boateng, L. Boakye-Yiadom, Jackeline Contreras, Jennifer Twyman, Zachary Catanzarite, Caren Grown, and Marya Hillesland. The Gender Asset and Wealth Gaps: Evidence from Ecuador, Ghana, and Karnataka, India. Bangalore: Indian Institute of Management Bangalore. 2011.

Collection Type:
Articles
Country:
Multiple Countries, India
Creator:
Doss, C., Deere, C.D., et al
Year:
2011

India Constitution

Collection Type:
Legal Materials
Country:
India
Creator:
India's Ministry of Law and Justice
Years:
2012, 2011

Gender and Property Rights: A Critical Issue in Urban Economic Development

Full citation: Rabenhorst, C. and Bean, A., "Gender and Property Rights: A Critical Issue in Urban Economic Development," IHC PAPER (August 2011). - This paper looks at: (1) gender equality in property rights, i.e., the rights of women to participate in property use and ownership with full legal and societal protection; (2) the importance to economic development of residential and commercial property rights in urban areas; and (3) the role of women in economic development. It profiles the Tanzania Settlements Trust, which forms groups of women that advocate together and provide support for tenure and housing access. It recommends that projects make gender a focus, adequately assess political, legal, and socio-cultural factors regarding gender, and provide training to the community covering: the legal rights of women specifically, including inheritance and divorce; special problems encountered by women such as documentation, location of registration offices, access to credit; involvement of both men and women in the adjudication process and in registration of rights; and clear communication of the benefits of participation.

[Threats to Women’s Land Tenure Security and Effectiveness of Interventions - Annotated Bibliography]

Collection Type:
Research Articles
Country:
Multiple Countries
Creator:
Rabenhorst, C. and Bean, A.
Year:
2011

Opinion about Developing the Rural Land Contracting and Operation Rights Pilot Project Work

Chinese Title: 关于开展农村土地承包经营权登记试点工作的意见2011

Collection Type:
Legal Materials
Country:
China
Creator:
Ministry of Agriculture; Ministry of Finance; Ministry of Land and Resources; Office of Agriculture and Industry of PRC;Legislative Affairs Office of the State Council PRC; the State Archives Administration of PRC
Year:
2011

Citation only: Implementation Rules of Nanjing City Social Security Measures for Staff Whose Land Has Been Expropriated

Chinese Title: 《南京市被征地人员社会保障办法》实施细则2010

Currently, we do not have the full-text of this law. Please contact us if you have this document. Thank you!

Collection Type:
Legal Materials
Country:
China
Creator:
Nanjing Municipal Human Resources and Social Security Bureau; Nanjing Finance Bureau; the Bureau of Land Resources Nanjing
Year:
2011

Women and Land: Securing Rights for Better Lives

Full citation: Budlender, D. and Alma, E., "Women and Land: Securing Rights for Better Lives," IDRC PAPERS (November 2011). - This book focuses on recent findings from sub Saharan Africa on women and land. It finds:
• Participation-oriented research methods are much more likely to bring about immediate benefits than other, more traditional research methods.
• Merely passing legislation is of little effect without the necessary resources for implementation, without informing and educating all relevant actors on the provisions of the legislation, without monitoring the reforms, and without effective sanctions on failure to implement.
• It is crucial both to consult and involve women when designing reforms and monitoring their implementation.
• Women’s access to land does not simply hinge on a choice between customary and statutory systems. Rather, we are faced with a more complex question of how the two systems interact and are used by different groups of women and men. The research also emphasizes the need to think about customary law as “living” and evolving.
• Addressing land injustices requires varied approaches that streamline and consolidate numerous land laws in a given country. It is vital to establish and maintain links among research, policy, practice, and people.
• The importance of providing teaching and training in a variety of disciplines for a young generation of women in Africa cannot be overstated.

[Threats to Women’s Land Tenure Security and Effectiveness of Interventions - Annotated Bibliography]

Collection Type:
Research Articles
Country:
Multiple Countries, Colombia, Pakistan, Malawi, Senegal, Cameroon
Creator:
Budlender, D. and Alma, E
Year:
2011

The Gender Implications of Large-Scale Land Deals

Full citation: Behrman, J., Meinzen-Dick, R. and Quisumbing, A. R., "The Gender Implicationsof Large-Scale Land Deals" 17 IFPRI POLICY BRIEF (April 2011). - This article addresses the current information gap on the differential gender effects of large-scale land deals through an overview of the phases of large-scale land deals and discussion of related effects on rural men and women; a presentation of further evidence using several case studies on the gender effects of large-scale deals; and a conclusion that looks at knowledge gaps and areas for further research as well as broad recommendations for gender equitable large-scale land deals. [Threats to Women’s Land Tenure Security and Effectiveness of Interventions - Annotated Bibliography]

Collection Type:
Research Articles
Country:
Multiple Countries, Indonesia, Mozambique
Creator:
Behrman, J., Meinzen-Dick, R. and Quisumbing, A. R.
Year:
2011

Women, Marriage and Asset Inheritance in Uganda

Full citation: Doss, C., Truong, M., Nabanoga, G. and Namaalwa, J., "Women, Marriage and Asset Inheritance in Uganda," 184 CPRC WORKING PAPER (Chronic Poverty Research Centre 2010). - The study uses a combination of qualitative and quantitative research. The first phase involved interviewing focus groups and key informants about assets held by men and women in the communities and on patterns of acquisition and social norms surrounding asset ownership and inheritance. The second phase was a household and intra-household survey. Life-history interviews were also conducted. The study found that many women gain access to land or ownership through their marital relationships. Both husbands and wives often indicate that land is owned jointly. However, rights over land differ for men and women, with women having fewer rights than men. Women do inherit land, both from their fathers and from their husbands, although it is much more common for men to inherit land. While women may successfully access land through their husbands, and may even claim ownership, these rights frequently depend on the stability of the marriage. Under most customary systems, a widow can claim land that belonged to her husband only if she has a son. The land will be inherited by the son, and the mother can continue to farm it until the son is grown-up and can claim it. Women without sons are at risk of losing access to the land, depending on their relationships with their husband’s family and the community. In spite of this arrangement, some widows have been able to maintain independent claims on land. [Threats to Women’s Land Tenure Security and Effectiveness of Interventions - Annotated Bibliography]

Collection Type:
Research Articles
Country:
Uganda
Creator:
Doss, C., Truong, M., Nabanoga, G. and Namaalwa, J.
Year:
2011