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Women's Struggle to Secure Land Rights

Full Citation: Kimani, M., "Women's Struggle to Secure Land Rights," 22(1) AFRICA RENEWAL (April 2008).

Collection Type:
Articles
Country:
Multiple Countries
Creator:
Kimani, M.
Year:
2008

Women's Land Rights in Rural China: Transforming Existing Laws into a Source of Property Rights

Full Citation: Liaw, R. H., "Women's Land Rights in Rural China: Transforming Existing Laws into a Source of Property Rights," 17(1) PACIFIC RIM LAW & POLICY JOURNAL 237 (2008). - In the aftermath of legal reforms designed to secure land tenure for farmers, women in rural China lost rights to land at marriage, divorce, and widowhood. Despite a central legal framework that facially protects women’s property interests, ambiguity in the property and marriage laws have allowed village leaders to reassert traditional social norms and deny constitutional equal rights guarantees for women. Recent attempts to ameliorate landlessness for women, specifically in the Rural Contract Law and the Property Law, offer little promise of providing a significant solution for rural women. New proposals to mitigate rural women’s loss of land rights must be framed in the cultural context of how social relations affect land rights. Legal reforms in rural China should focus on strengthening women’s property rights within marriage, as well as securing external rights to property. Women’s land tenure would be better protected under a more clearly defined community property regime that recognizes rural land contracts issued both prior to and during marriage as jointly possessed. Such measures would give women access to a legal platform at divorce or widowhood, when they are most likely to experience landlessness. [Threats to Women’s Land Tenure Security and Effectiveness of Interventions - Annotated Bibliography]

Collection Type:
Research Articles
Country:
China
Creator:
Liaw, R. H.
Year:
2008

Legal Empowerment in Practice: Using Legal Tools to Secure Land Rights in Africa

Full citation: Cotula, L. and Mathieu, P., "Legal Empowerment in Practice: Using Legal Tools to Secure Land Rights in Africa," IIED & FAO REPORT (May 2008).

Collection Type:
Articles
Country:
Multiple Countries, Mali, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Cameroon, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Mozambique, Tanzania, Uganda
Creator:
Cotula, L. and Mathieu, P.
Year:
2008

Gender Issues in Land Policy and Administration

Full citation: World Bank, FAO & IFAD, "Gender Issues in Land Policy and Administration," MODULE 4 of GENDER IN AGRICULTURE SOURCEBOOK (October 2008).

Collection Type:
Articles
Country:
Multiple Countries
Creator:
World Bank, FAO, and IFAD
Year:
2008

Land Registration in Ethiopia: Early Impacts on Women

Full citation: Holden, S. and Tefera, T., "Land Registration in Ethiopia: Early Impacts on Women," UN-HABITAT REPORT (October 2008).

Collection Type:
Articles
Country:
Ethiopia
Creator:
Holden, S. and Tefera, T.
Year:
2008

From Being Property of Men to Becoming Equal Owners? Early Impacts of Land Regulation and Certification of Women in Southern Ethiopia

Full citation: Holden, S. and Tefera, T., "From Being Property of Men to Becoming Equal Owners? Early Impacts of Land Regulation and Certification of Women in Southern Ethiopia," FINAL RESEARCH REPORT (UN-HABITAT and GLTN, January 2008). - Land certification has been implemented in Ethiopia since 1998 and over 5 million certificates have been delivered. This study in the Oromiya region (OR) and the Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples region (SNNPR) of Ethiopia, aims to assess the early impacts of land registration and certification that has been implemented there since 2004. Special emphasis is placed on the impacts of the reform on women, including the impacts of joint certification for husbands and wives. While the land laws first introduced in the Oromiya and SNNP regions in 2002 and 2003 stated that the husband could have his name on only one certificate, resistance caused a change such that certificates could be issued jointly to the husband and his wives, or the husband’s name could also be included below the name of his second and later wives, while he has his name first on the certificate with his first wife.

The study finds that low-cost land reform in Southern Ethiopia has contributed to increase the perceptions of tenure security for both women and men. The women’s names on the land certificates increased the perception that the women would be able to keep the land after the divorce or death of their husband, with some differences among wives in polygamous households. The reform had limited impact on women’s ability to influence farm management, perhaps because of the prevalence of sharecropping. The study recommends that information dissemination, mobilisation and organisation of women’s group. [Threats to Women’s Land Tenure Security and Effectiveness of Interventions - Annotated Bibliography]

Collection Type:
Research Articles
Country:
Ethiopia
Creator:
Holden, S. and Tefera, T.
Year:
2008