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Accessing Justice: Models, Strategies and Best Practices on Women's Empowerment

Full citation: IDLO, "Accessing Justice: Models, Strategies and Best Practices on Women's Empowerment," IDLO REPORT (2013). - This paper highlights some of the challenges and solutions for women’s access to justice in diverse legal systems. It shows that women face structural and cultural barriers to accessing justice – insufficient knowledge of rights and remedies, illiteracy or poor literacy, and lack of resources or time to participate in justice processes. This is all the more so as women usually have intensive family responsibilities. Even where women can access the formal justice sector, the outcomes of the process often fall far short of those envisaged by international standards, particularly with regard to property rights, inheritance, divorce and child custody, and spousal abuse. Focusing on legal empowerment as a way to improve both access to justice and the quality of justice women receive, the study presents strategies and best practices in both formal and informal justice systems. Legal empowerment approaches share one core concept: using the law to enable disadvantaged groups to access justice and realize basic rights. They include legal education; legal aid services; support for non-discriminatory dispute resolution fora to complement or supplement informal systems; training of paralegals; and rights awareness. In considering whether such approaches can improve the quality of justice women receive, Accessing Justice brings together a number of IDLO-sponsored case studies in Afghanistan, India, Namibia, Rwanda, Mozambique, Tanzania, Morocco, Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. These highlight a variety of lessons for development practitioners, both in terms of engagement with the informal legal sector and, more generally, for the use of legal empowerment and top-down / bottom-up strategies. In an appropriate context, carefully designed legal empowerment strategies may constitute a valuable contribution to improving women’s access to justice.
[Threats to Women’s Land Tenure Security and Effectiveness of Interventions - Annotated Bibliography]

Collection Type:
Research Articles
Country:
Multiple Countries, Bougainville, Solomon Islands, Afghanistan, Namibia, Mozambique, Tanzania, Rwanda, India
Creator:
IDLO
Year:
2013

Beyond Ownership: Tracking progress on women’s land rights in Sub-Saharan Africa

Full citation: Slavchevska, V., De la O Campos, A. P., Brunelli, C., & Doss, C. (2017). Beyond Ownership: Tracking progress on women’s land rights in Sub-Saharan Africa. In Paper presented at the World Bank Land and Poverty Conference, Washington DC, March 20-24.

Collection Type:
Articles
Country:
Multiple Countries
Creator:
Slavchevska, V., De la O Campos, A. P., Brunelli, C., & Doss, C.
Year:
2017

Chad Gender Index Report

Collection Type:
Articles
Country:
Chad
Creator:
OECD and Social Institutions & Gender Index
Year:
2013

Cocoa, Marriage, Labour, and Land in Ghana: Some Matrilineal and Patrilineal Perspectives

Full citation: Duncan, B.A. (2010). “Cocoa, Marriage, Labour, and Land in Ghana: Some Matrilineal and Patrilineal Perspectives.” Africa: Journal of the International African Institute 80 (2), 301–21. - Based on field research conducted between April 2006 and November 2007 in four matrilineal and two patrilineal communities located in the Brong Ahafo, Western and Volta regions, the study sets out important changes taking place within the institutions of marriage, land tenure and conjugal labour relations, within the cocoa production sector. Many scholars have documented systems of land exchange between husbands and wives for services rendered within the context of cocoa farming. This study shows that new and previously undocumented forms of informal conjugal unions may be coming into existence in the context of cocoa production, and these new arrangements provide much less land tenure security for women.

In the matrilineal communities especially, formal marriage arrangements appear to be an exception rather than the prevailing norm. Contract marriages, popular in the western region, are essentially seasonal arrangements made between men and women particularly during the cocoa harvesting season, which lasts for a period of three to six months, after which the relationship is either renewed or terminated. No land is exchanged in a contract marriage. Consensual unions are not as secure as formal marriages, but are a step toward formal marriage. In one case, the Ghanaian court said women in such relationships were entitled to a one-third share of cocoa land which they had assisted their partners to develop. [Threats to Women’s Land Tenure Security and Effectiveness of Interventions - Annotated Bibliography]

Collection Type:
Research Articles
Country:
Ghana
Creator:
Duncan, B.A.
Year:
2010

A Conceptual Model of Women and Girls' Empowerment

BMGF White Paper by A. van Eerdewijk, F. Wong, C. Vaast, J. Newton, M. Tyszler, & A. Pennington

Collection Type:
Articles
Country:
Multiple Countries
Creator:
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Year:
2017

Côte d'Ivoire Inclusive Development Approach Creates the Space for Women to Benefit from Artisanal Mining

One of three Women, Land, and Mining Case Studies.  These individual case studies, summarized together in a separate synthesis report, represent diverse geographies, different scales of mining, different political and cultural contexts, differing project funding sources, a range of stages in the mining lifecycle, and diverse project approaches. They each contain more detail than the overarching synthesis report.

Collection Type:
Articles
Country:
Côte d'Ivoire
Creator:
Rugadya, M. A.
Year:
2019

Deeds and Misdeeds: Land Titling and Women's Rights in Tanzania

"This article draws on field research in different parts of Tanzania—the southern highlands, the central plateau, the shores of Lake Tanganyika, to the west, and the lush valley of Babati, in the northern region of Manyara—to examine the gendered outcomes of the land-formalization process. We present a number of specific case studies, involving women in varying social positions and land parcels of different value. Over the course of eight years, our team also investigated titling in some forty villages, assessing the certification data in the land registries of different districts.4 First, though, it may be helpful to set out some more general coordinates of land formalization."

Collection Type:
Articles
Country:
Tanzania
Creator:
Askew, K. and Odgaard, R.
Year:
2019

Delivering on Women Farmers’ Rights

Full citation: Euphrasia, A. (2015). “Delivering on Women Farmers’ Rights.” - This policy brief discusses the reasons that the situation for women smallholder farmers across Africa has not changed much in the past decade. It identifies four main barriers to women smallholder farmers’ participation: women’s access to and control of land; unpaid care work (childcare, household maintenance, etc.); women’s lack of access to finance and extension services offered by the state; and limited state investments in the agricultural sector. [Threats to Women’s Land Tenure Security and Effectiveness of Interventions - Annotated Bibliography]

Collection Type:
Research Articles
Country:
Multiple Countries
Creator:
Euphrasia, A.
Year:
2015